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Erika McMahon-Turner Cheetham (7 luglio del 1939 – 3 maggio del 1998[1]) era una scrittrice inglese, studiosa del medioevo meglio nota per la sua controversa interpretazione degli scritti di Nostradamus.

GiovinezzaModifica

Nata Erica Christine Elizabeth McMahon-Turner a Londra. I suoi genitori la scrissero in una scuola conventuale, dalla quale venne espulsa per aver suggerito la non esistenza di Dio. in seguito, mentre frequentava il St Anne's College di Oxford, sposò James Nicholas Milne Cheetham.[1]

Dopo il suo dottorato in lingue medioevali, ottenuto ad Oxford, iniziò il lavoro come redattrice impiegata per il Daily Mail, un tabloid di Londra. iniziò a tradurre Les Prophéties de M. Nostradamus nel 1963, che culminò nella pubblicazione del suo primo libro The Prophecies of Nostradamus: The Man Who Saw Tomorrow nel 1965. Su questo libro si è basato il film di Orson Welles del 1980 "The Man Who Saw Tomorrow".[1]

Interpretazione di specifiche profezieModifica

"Angolmois"Modifica

Prophéties 10:72 is one of Nostradamus' most infamous quatrains:

L'an mil neuf cens nonante neuf sept mois,
Du ciel viendra vn grand Roy d'effrayeur:
Resusciter le grand Roy d'Angolmois,
Avant que Mars regner par bonheur.

Cheetham interpreted Angolmois as a cryptic anagram for "Mongols", predicting the rise (circa mid-1999) of an Antichrist—ostensibly the third such figure (after Napoleon and Hitler)—a tyrant ("king of terror") of Genghis Khan's caliber. However, other scholars have argued that this is merely a variant spelling of Angoumois, a province of western France now known as Charente, and that d'effrayeur was actually supposed to be deffraieur, i.e. one given to appeasement.[2]

"Samarobryn"Modifica

Si grand Famine par unde pestifere.
Par pluye longue le long du polle arctique:
Samarobryn cent lieux de l'hemisphere,
Vivront sans loy exempt de pollitique.

However, Cheetham dissents again from other Nostradamian scholars—and from herself—by proposing that Nostradamus derived the word samarobryn either:

  • From the Russian words само and робрин[3]—meaning something to the tune of "self-operated", i.e. a self-operating machine in space, 100 leagues from the hemisphere (or atmosphere), "living without law [and] exempt from politics",[4] or:
  • From the trade names of wonder-drugs Suramin and Ribavirin.[4] Pondered Cheetham: "Perhaps the remedy for AIDS will be produced in a sterile laboratory circling the Earth?"[5]

"Pau, Nay, Loron"Modifica

Cheetham cited quatrains 1:60 and 8:1 of Nostradamus' Prophéties as a cryptic reference to Napoleon Bonaparte.

Un Empereur naistra pres d'Italie,
Qui à l'Empire sera vendu bien cher,
Diront avec quels gens il se ralie
Qu'on trouvera moins prince que boucher.
PAU, NAY, LORON plus feu qu'a sang sera,
Laude nager, fuir grand aux surrez:
Les agassas entree refusera,
Pampon, Durance les tiendra enferrez.

Whilst the uppercase letters (preserved from Nostradamus' original) may suggest a deeper meaning, skeptics will note the mutual proximity of the Aquitainian villages Pau, Nay, and Oloron (in southwestern France), which form a small triangle not Template:Convert about.[6][7] Though more esoteric interpretations have pegged this region "more fire than blood" as a future nuclear waste site,[8] Cheetham's observation was that the capitalized letters can be arranged to spell something like "NAYPAULORON", i.e. Napoleon. Singer-songwriter and hist-rock pioneer Al Stewart also favored this interpretation in his 1974 song "Nostradamus", wherein he deliberately pronounces and spells Bonaparte's name in a similar idiosyncratic manner.[9]

An emperor of France shall rise who will be born near Italy
His rule cost his empire dear, Napoloron [sic] his name shall be

"Hister"Modifica

Vedi anche l'articolo "Hister" sulla Wikipedia in inglese


Prophéties 2:24:

Bestes farouches de faim fleuves tranner :
Plus part du champ encontre Hister sera,
En caige de fer le grand fera treisner,
Quand rien enfant de Germain observera.

Cheetham interpreted this as a reference to Adolf Hitler, the "child of Germany [who] obeys [no law]". This conclusion disregards Hitler's Austrian heritage and the Latin use of Hister (derived from the Milesian–Greek settlement of Histria in ancient Thrace, and in turn from the Scythian river-god Ίστρος/Istros) to refer to the Lower Danube.[10] Nonetheless this too is preserved in Stewart's lyrics:[9]

One named Hister shall become a captain of Greater Germany
No Law does this man observe and bloody his rise and fall shall be

IsraelModifica

Prophéties 3:97:

Nouvelle loy terre neufve occuper,
Vers la Syrie, Judée et Palestine:
Le grand empire barbare corruer,
Avant que Phoebus son siecle determine.

This prophecy, according to Cheetham, predicts the establishment of the modern State of Israel.[11]

BibliografiaModifica

NotesModifica

  1. 1,0 1,1 1,2 Noble, Holcomb B (June 8, 1998). "Erika Cheetham Dies at 58; An Expert on Nostradamus". The New York Times: p. B-11. Archived from the original on June 20, 2009. http://www.webcitation.org/5hfrKjTtz. Retrieved 2009-06-19. 
  2. Ian Wilson, Nostradamus: The Man Behind the Prophecies, Macmillan & Co., 2007. ISBN 0-312-31791-3
  3. "КЛЮЧИ К СПАСЕНИЮ ЯВЛЯЮТСЯ С "НЕБА"". nostradam.ru. January 7, 2009. Archived from the original on June 21, 2009. http://www.webcitation.org/5hhMtEkoT. Retrieved 2009-06-19. 
  4. 4,0 4,1 Prophet, Elizabeth Clare; Spadaro, Patricia R.; Steinman, Murray L., Saint Germain's Prophecy for the New Millennium: Includes Dramatic Prophecies from Nostradamus, Edgar Cayce and Mother Mary, Summit University Press, 1999. 56–57 ISBN 0-922729-45-X
  5. Erika Cheetham, The Final Prophecies of Nostradamus, Perigee PressJuly 1, 1989, ISBN 0-399-51516-X
  6. R.W Welch, Comet of Nostradamus: August 2004 – Impact!, Llewellyn Worldwide, 2000. ISBN 1-56718-816-8
  7. See also Google Maps
  8. Webber, Allan (July 6, 2007). "Anagrams, Code in Nostradamus Prophecies + nuclear disaster predictions". Adelaide. http://nostradamusdecoded.com/Nuclear.htm. Retrieved 2009-06-21. 
  9. 9,0 9,1 Template:Cite music release notes
  10. Robert Todd Carroll, The skeptic's dictionary: a collection of strange beliefs, amusing deceptions, and dangerous delusions, John Wiley and Sons, 2003. ISBN 0-471-27242-6
  11. David Ovason, The Secrets of Nostradamus: A Radical New Interpretation of the Master's Prophecies, HarperCollins, 2002. 113–115 ISBN 0-06-008439-1

Fonti Modifica




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